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Finn Lough Aghnablaney, Enniskillen, Ireland

Hotelhighlights

Cycling and scenic walks through the grounds
Water views from the cottage suites
Regional recipes with contemporary flair at The Kitchen

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There's a reason Ireland is called the emerald isle, and the rolling green hills leading up to the woodlands of Finn Lough prove verdant testimony to the nation's illustrious moniker. Tucked on the shores of Lough Erne, this sprawling estate—capping in just over 75 acres—is equal parts posh resort and countryside seclusion. Hotel Website

Little tykes are well-catered to; parents can drop them off at the indoor play area before having at their own outdoor games.

Hotelfacts

  • Vibe and atmosphere

    Itching to explore the shimmering grounds? Take your pick—there's boating on the marina, fishing on the Erne, or guided pathways for walking, geared towards those seeking a somewhat tranquil alternative.
  • Overall look and feel of the rooms

    The five varieties of accommodations are vastly different: The slanted walls of the catered suites, the stunning water vistas of the lakefront cottages, but all feature decidedly modern interiors.
  • Service style

    Friendly staffers are keen to recommend their favorite must-see site (would-be royalty can lord over a legion of nearby castles) or rally groups for a round of airsoft in the lush foliage surrounding the property.
  • Preferred room type

    Paul Simon sang about the boy in the bubble, but here it's a dazzling reality. The two domes (one more is in the works), nestled in the forests, are mostly transparent—save for the sides facing the faraway neighbors—to allow for magnificent views of the surrounding forest and, come nightfall, the entrancing night sky.
  • Unique property features

    You may find yourself toasting "Slainte" more than once in the onsite restaurant, The Kitchen. The cozy hub sources most of its ingredients from local vendors (seafood hails from the Donegal coast, less than 20 miles away); afternoon tea is a particularly quaint affair, with homemade scones and beverages enjoyed before the crackling fire.